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Girl Scout Troop 6841
(Virden, Illinois)
 
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History of Girl Scouts


Juliette "Daisy" Gordon Low assembled 18 girls from Savannah, Georgia, on March 12, 1912, for a local Girl Scout meeting. She believed that all girls should be given the opportunity to develop physically, mentally, and spiritually. With the goal of bringing girls out of isolated home environments and into community service and the open air, Girl Scouts hiked, played basketball, went on camping trips, learned how to tell time by the stars, and studied first aid.

Within a few years, Daisy's dream for a girl-centered organization was realized. Today, Girl Scouts of the USA has a membership of over 3.2 million girls and adults, a significant growth from its modest beginnings nearly a century ago. In fact, more than 59 million women in the U.S. today are Girl Scout alumnae. We invite you to learn about our robust organization and its rich history. From our willingness to tackle important societal issues, to our commitment to diversity and inclusiveness—Girl Scouts is dedicated to every girl, everywhere.

Who We Are


 

Who We Are
Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) is the largest organization for girls in the world. Our mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Through activities in science and technology, business and economic literacy, and outdoor and environmental awareness, Girl Scouting provides girls with opportunities for fun and friendship while fostering the development of leadership skills and self-esteem.

Founded by Juliette Gordon Low in Savannah, Georgia, on March 12, 1912—100 years ago—Girl Scouts of the USA was chartered by the United States Congress on March 16, 1950. Today, there are 3.2 million Girl Scouts: 2.3 million girl members and 890,000 adult members working primarily as volunteers.

What We Do
In Girl Scouts, girls develop their leadership potential through activities that enable them to discover their values, skills, and the world around them; connect with others in a multicultural environment; and take action to make a difference in the world.

Our Structure
Headquartered in New York City, Girl Scouts has 112 chartered councils nationwide. These councils provide direct services to girls and the volunteers who work with them, and to the communities they serve. Girl Scouting is open to all girls from kindergarten through high school.

National Leadership
National Leadership Founder: Juliette Gordon LowHonorary National President: Michelle ObamaNational President, GSUSA: Connie L. LindseyChief Executive Officer: Anna Maria Chávez

Key Alumnae Stats
• Ten of seventeen women (59 percent) in the United States Senate are former Girl Scouts. • Forty-five of seventy-five women (60 percent) in the House of Representatives are former Girl Scouts.
• Fifty-three percent of all women business owners are former Girl Scouts.
• Seventy-six percent of all Girl Scout alumnae report that Girl Scouts had a positive impact
in their lives.

For More Information
If you are interested in joining, volunteering with, or donating to Girl Scouts in your community, please call 800-GSUSA-4-U (800-478-7248) or visit www.girlscouts.

 

Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. 

 

About Girl Scouts


Girl Scout Mission: Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.  Girl Scouts of the USA is the world’s preeminent organization dedicated solely to girls—all girls—where, in an accepting and nurturing environment, girls build character and skills for success in the real world. In partnership with committed adult volunteers, girls develop qualities that will serve them all their lives, like leadership, strong values, social conscience, and conviction about their own potential and self-worth.

Juliette "Daisy" Gordon Low assembled 18 girls from Savannah, Georgia, on March 12, 1912, for a local Girl Scout meeting. She believed that all girls should be given the opportunity to develop physically and mentally. With the goal of bringing girls out of isolated home environments and into community service and the open air, Girl Scouts hiked, played basketball, went on camping trips, learned how to tell time by the stars, and studied first aid. Within a few years, Daisy's dream for a girl-centered organization was realized. Today, Girl Scouts of the USA has a membership of over 3.4 million girls and adults, a significant growth from its modest beginnings nearly a century ago. From our willingness to tackle important societal issues, to our commitment to diversity and inclusiveness—Girl Scouts is dedicated to every girl, everywhere.

What do Girl Scouts do? The answer is almost anything a girl would like to do! The Girl Scout Leadership Experience engages girls in discovering self, connecting with others, and taking action to make the world a better place. All Girl Scout experiences are intentionally designed to tie to one or more of the 15 national leadership outcomes, or benefits, categorized under three keys to leadership.

The Three Keys to Leadership

  • Discover: Girls understand themselves and their values and use their knowledge and skills to explore the world.
  • Connect: Girls care about, inspire, and team with others locally and globally.
  • Take Action: Girls act to make the world a better place.

The Girl Scout Leadership Experience is girl-driven, reflecting the ever-changing needs and interests of participating girls. It provides girls in kindergarten through twelfth grade with a wide variety of leadership opportunities. The program encourages increased skill-building and responsibility, and also promotes the development of strong leadership and decision-making skills. All program activities are grade-appropriate and based on the Girl Scout Leadership Experience, as well as on the Girl Scout Promise and Law.

No matter what age, girls learn the value and the fun of sharing experiences in an all-girl environment, with caring, trained adults to serve as mentors and models. All activities are designed with girls in mind to spark their interests, address their concerns, build their skills, and explore the world around them.